Last Monday at Rio – Slam!!

Posted on Updated on

The Rio Cafe

Glasgow

24-11-14

Twice a year, the ever-cuddly Robin Cairns replaces his normal open mike night at Glasgow with the brutal sport that is  the poetry slam. Robin quipped to the Mumble, ‘its open to all & they’re all here!” & indeed, the Rio Cafe was positively bursting at the seams for the event, an excellent testament to Glasgow’s growing, unpretentious & inspirational spoken word scene.

On this occasion, nineteen poets competed ‘Glasgow-rules’ throughout two rounds of bite-sized, two minute Chicken mc’nugget monologues. The judges for the evening were Nelly Bean, Derek Parks, Carly Brown, the Mumble’s own Stephen Watt & Carly Brown, the winner of the 2013 Scottish poetry slam championships. She too would have competed in a similar slam on the way to her title, & of course tonights winner would not only find themeselves £50 better off, but would also be given an entry into next February’s Scottish poetry slam championships.

The nights winner, incidentally, was the keen-minded & verbally rumbistious Kevin Mclean, one of the famous ‘Loud Poets’ of Edinburgh. For me, I didnt really mind who won, for I loved the wide array of philosopher-poets that srutted their stuff on the Rio’s sacred stage. As I’d entered the bustling  ‘arena’ I found myself sat with the young, & who turned out to be quite talented, Liam Mccormick, who very kindly sent me the first of his poems of the night, which reads as follows;

The Minor Tragedy of Reefer Madness

Drugs are fucking great.

Like…. really fucking great

You get an itch, you send a text, you get a call, walk to Tesco, behind the bins, go home, with a bag.

Then you get your baccy, your skins, your roach, lay a bedrock of shredded brown leaves, put the

weed through the grinder, tap it out on the paper, sprinkle some tobacco, run your fingers up the

side, lick the gum, run your fingers up the side aaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnd-

Where’s my lighter?

Check your pockets, look in the drawer, under the couch, kitchen table, bathroom cupboard,

flatmates desk (He still smokes right?), old jacket pockets, under the couch, lift the cushions, check

your back pockets- FUCK SAKE- check the fridge, washing machine, loft- I JUST WANT TO SMOKE A

FUCKIN’ JAY- kitchen again, top of the microwave, behind the microwave, inside the microwave,

behind the bread bin, behind the toaster…

Slam down the slide, filament fires up, press the soon to be cherry against the makeshift chemical

launch pad, inhale, inhale, inhale.

Inhale.            

                                                                f    

                                       f

                         u

            p

I would never presume to say, I have a problem with hash- I just like a smoke out

AND THE ONLY PROBLEM AH’VE HAD IS RUNNING OUT

But yet, when the sun rises and I fancy a slice of toast- I know-

I’ll have to settle for microwaved bread at most.

The rest of the poems on offer were full of intelligent word-play, hip-hop bibidibop, failed romances & socio-political diatribe, a wonderful selection that really should have done Mr Cairns, & Glasgow proud. Everyone was happy, the slammers & their entourages joining in the fun & applause rather than looking at  each with those dagger-pupil’d eyes that often accompany poetry slams, & for the neutral we had a grand old time.

Reviewer : Damo Bullen

Aloud # 8

Posted on

Queen Margaret Union

Glasgow

20-11-14

A solid five years had passed since I last graced the QMU. On that occasion, Kula Shaker provided the entertainment, and the last morsel of my twenties bopped along to the sounds of my teens. This time however, an entirely different spectacle was exhibited at the University Gardens venue inside Jim’s Bar; the eighth and final show for 2014, of Aloud – the cavalcade of spoken word talents, was tonight’s hot ticket in town. The brain-child of Ireland’s Syd Briscoe and New York’s Heather Margaret St Clair initiated due to a significant dearth of spoken word opportunities around the Glasgow University campus. Rather than tie the event in to a student stranglehold, Aloud was engineered to welcome poets and performers from all realms to step up to the microphone – and test themselves in front of a friendly, uncontaminated and responsive audience. The decision to make this a free event of course endeared itself to students and literary veterans alike.

Of course, where the already-established Verse Hearse, held within the confines of the Gilchrist Postgraduate Club, offers itself to the ears of postgraduate students and staff, the ideology behind Aloud is perhaps one of a more raw and wide-eyed look into performance poetry – the Simba to the Verse Hearse’s Mufasa. Its refreshing fáilte is carefully tuned in to the Glasgow spoken word scene mentality where both rookies and seasoned slammers extend appreciation and consideration when fellow performers are afforded stage time.    This is not to say that this event was libraryesque (Yes, I just invented a new word); it was a student union after all. Minor disturbances included one female bursting through the doors with her skirt tucked into her underwear, and another attracted intoxicated students holding one another up before the clock had even ticked 10pm. This was delicately handled by the organisers, and did not spoil the otherwise-engaged crowd.

David Forrest perfo'rming Seville'
David Forrest perfo’rming Seville’

A strong focus on spoken word, sprinkled with flashes of clever performance poetry, and topics ranging broadly from anti-whaling to mental illness absorbed the audience’s attention. David Forrest’s benevolent poem ‘Cross’ leant itself to a compassionate look at the symbolism of a crucifix (“Bits of skin like cracked paint”), while Lynn Pilkington’s marvellous piece ‘City Girl’s Mission’ cavorted wonderfully between the persona of being strong and self-sufficient with ineffable, romantic notions (“Waiting for the rose tinted glasses to kick in”). In poets such as Callum Bannerman and Ross MacFarlane, and indeed the afore-mentioned hosts Briscoe and St Clair, it became clear that Glasgow’s continuing ascent in spoken word has plenty more worthy champions willing to advocate the good news that the city’s literary scene is flourishing.

Callum Bannerman
Callum Bannerman

The first Aloud zine is earmarked for January 2015, new members are surfacing at each live event, and a promising YouTube channel is devoted to filming participating poets who may otherwise never have had the opportunity to see their poems on the internet. Few could argue that Aloud is a fantastic addition to the current spoken word scene in Glasgow, permitting new audiences and knocking down barriers which once existed (No, you don’t require a friend in the university to sign you in). As for negative points about the evening……..the diet coke was rank.   Last time, I left the QMU to Shaker’s Crispin Mills’ wailing Hush to an adoring crowd. This time, everything was very much Aloud.

Reviewer : Stephen Watt

Jo Caulfield presents… The Speakeasy

Posted on Updated on

Scottish Storytelling Centre

Edinburgh

Tuesday18th November

Comedian and actress Jo Caulfield hosts six short acts of varying styles, & makes up an evening that feels more like one of those lucky days at the Edinburgh festival when you randomly chose a class act of a show. For £6 the evening was an eclectic mix, with each act flowing well about Jo’s interludes of easy-humour and performer introductions. The whole effect was a mixture of a stand up comedy club, a poetry slam and an episode of QI. Jo Caulfield could host anything and I’d happily go – her style is so friendly & honest, we all feellike we’ve been personally invited to her home. Tonight, this was the Netherbow Theatre under The Scottish Story Telling Centre; a lovely, cozy, simple little Theatre in the heart of the Royal Mile.
First up was Sam Small, a member of the Black Lantern collective. A talented poet, he performed 3 of his pieces around the themes of ‘boxes, love and time travel’. All performed at a fast pace, – hyper, funny, angry, and intelligently executed. He had the audience intrigued and impressed from the first sentence and I was left wanting more. A talented guy.

Author Eleanor Updale spoke next, a friendly and warm presence, Eleanor told some wickedly funny & partly true, partly fiction (never 100% sure where the boundaries lay but who needs to know?) tales of what she and her media comrades are planning to do next after they have been robbed of the retirement pensions there were expecting. A story of pitching an idea to the BBC about an X-factor style show minus the music – just focusing on the sob stories called ‘Dead Nans’, followed into a weird and wonderful pretty believable plan to run a restaurant/brothel for pensioners with ‘live stream for TV’ in Edinburgh was surreal and lovely and sounded completely homely and respectable.

Phil O’Shea then shuffled onto stage and sucked the audience into his weird and wonderful surreal world. A intentionally nervous awkward style all of his own perhaps made the audience a little unsure for a few seconds before we realised that actually that’s how we were meant to feel and settled in for the ride. A squeaky northern accented turtle hand puppet accompanied some of the act and that’s all I can really write without rambling crazy nonsense as he does it so much wonderfully better!

The second half was kicked off with journalist and broadcaster from Radio 4’s Today Show James Naughtie. An engaging speaker, he told some great stories of ridiculous things that have happened when interviewing politicians, with some great tidbits and insights about his life as a journalist. A funny and interesting talk.

Next up we had Bram E Gieben Alias Texture, a poet also from the Black Lantern collective. Two poems were performed with thunderous hypnotic fury. The intelligent angry rhythmical ‘Burn’ was a wrenching strongly executed rant at the state of the economy, whilst ‘Keep going’ was as he said with a smile, ‘about divorce, suicide and cancer but -much more positive’. And it was – a powerful committed performance from this hugely talented poet. Highly impressive.

Last up was the bizarre ‘The Creative Martyrs’. Looking like an old fashioned mime cabaret act, the two chaps performed a slightly confusing piece with a cello and visual humour singing about war. I found it a little hard to follow exactly what they were singing about, but they were pretty funny to watch and ended the evening on a light note.

All in all a really lovely way to spend a wintery Tuesday evening and something completely different to see each time. I’d fully recommend spending £6 once a month to go to this lovely evening of well chosen performances and enjoy Jo Caulfield’s welcoming generous hosting and obvious love of the city’s talent.

Reviewer : Pip Burnett

HOWL(ing)

Posted on Updated on

The Traverse Theater. Edinburgh
16th October 2014
 431___Selected[1]
So my first review for this new season of theater. The first of the theatrical responses that represent the viewpoint of young people. whose hearts couldn’t be in a better place, hopes, dreams and aspirations for the world in which they are to inherit as told through poetry. A body of work, that really represents the voice of a generation, who quite rightly so, have a valid and creative platform on which to get their point across.
The poetic style draws its inspiration from the 1950’s Beat Poet, Allen Ginsburg. Who documented generational despair through poetry in the same way that this wonderful gifted poetic masterpiece has skillfully and succinctly been crafted to say. That the referendum was a success for the Yes campaign, because it has created an informed youth movement who are Humanitarian by nature. Knowledge is power. And poetry as well informed as this is nothing short of revolutionary.
Written by Drew Taylor and Julia Doogan, the poetry is rapped out by three Beat Poets; David Rankine, Leyla Josephine and Drew Taylor, accompanied by the brilliantly performed music of Julia Doogan (Vocals and Guitar) Jennifer Hamilton (Keyboards and percussion.). This is an essential performance that will speak its truth for years to come. Because it is the voice a generation that said Yes. FIVE STARS
5-stars
Reviewer : Mark (Divine) Calvert.

Clarke Carlisle

Posted on Updated on

Edinburgh International Book Festival

 

67dac432

 

 

During his time as a professional footballer, Clark Carlisle was considered to be Britain’s brainiest footballer, even knocking a reigning champion off his perch on Countdown in 2010. Writing a full length book, however, was a different kettle of fish, as Clarke readily admitted during his amenable chit-chat with fellow former footballer, Pat Nevin, at the Edinburgh Book Fest His book,. ‘You Don’t Know Me, But,‘ is an auobiographical confessional piece, in which Carlisle takes us from his multi-racial beginnings in Preston, to his recent position as chairman of the Professional Footballers Association.

 

jpeg

 

Clarke Carlisle is a lovely chap, a well-spoken & family man who finds himself these fays with the plumb job of commentating at premier league football matches. His talk touched a number of interesting places, such as his addiction problems & handling of the John Terry/Anton Ferdinand racial case. The best moment for me, however, came during the Q&A session, when an audience member asked Carlisle what was his favorite moment on the pitch. I was at Wembley myself in 2009, when Burnley triumphed over Sheffield United in the Championship play-offs. But this was only his second favorite moment. The first was scoring the last-minute winner for Blackpool against Carlisle, with his mum attending one of his football matches for the very first time. That moment, he said, is when he fell in love with football, & his animated demeanor as he told the story showed very much how that love is still there.

 

Damo Bullen

 

 

 

 

 

Hilary Roberts

Posted on Updated on

Edinburgh International Book Festival

 

th

 

After a week of remembering the brutality of the last 100 years, A celebration of the fallen victims, the young men that had no choice but to meet an untimely fate. From the war film footage of Beyond Zero (1914-1918). Which was harrowing in an insightful way and beautiful in a musical way. To this hour long presentation by The British War Museum employee Hilary Roberts. A pictorial history (with Mark Holborn) of how photography was developed as an art of propaganda, to show people back home.how effective the armed forces were being in there campaign to slaughter,before being slaughtered them selves. It was brutal. Stories of photographers who’s soul purpose it was to photograph men killing each other. Hillary explained that the photographers ended up going mad with trauma of such experience. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder was only coined in the 90’s. These guys really did suffer for there art.


jpeg

 


The rain hammered down on the Book Festival marquee as the disturbing images were projected on to a screen. For some reason I thought that this was going to be a book festival gig about the poetry of Ladies longing for the safe return of loves, who were fighting in this horrible horrible war. But it wasn’t, it was to promote the disturbing pictures of death and destruction that occurred in the Great War. Why anyone would want to purchase such a thing is beyond me. Never mind get one autographed. The reason that I don’t have a telly, radio or buy newspapers is because imagery such as this disturbs the joy out of me. And disturb me it did, I wandered home through the rain with a cloud of doom, looming precariously and hanging heavy in my heart. A Stormy Emotional Evening.

 

Mark ‘Divine’ Calvert

Irvine Welsh

Posted on Updated on

Irvine Welsh. The Edinburgh International Book Festival.
 
 
th
 
 
I am writing this as a pre show review in the peace of the Yurt in Charlotte Square Gardens. Its a huge one that provides the back stage and production base for the festival. Its so peaceful, my mobile phone is charging, so I am taking some time to write in the conducive cool, away from the strength of the sun.Tonight I am reviewing Irvine Welsh, a local boy that has done us proud. And influenced a generation of a certain age, through the film adaptation of “Train Spotting”. Mr Welsh is the most famed Scottish Writer Since Rabbie Burns. And just like Burns in his day. Irvine Welsh is the voice of his people. A working Class Hero, who has never lost touch with his roots. He has certainly influenced my life. What an Honor. To be an official reviewer for this Legend. Cannae wait.
 
I got to the book festival at 8.00pm, and had a pint of Strongbow, and some chocolate cake to eat while sat in the garden,that is Charlotte Square, among the New Town at the end of George Street and yearly home to “The Edinburgh International  Book Festival*. It is a lovely space, a sanctuary of green. conducive to  pensive thought Wrapped up in my favorite cozy coat and relaxed.I sipped my cider and took in the space as dusk brought a different atmosphere to the festival. I joined the queue at about 9,00pm. I made a new friend called Linda, we had a giggle because we were both so excited. Linda’s Son and his girlfriend were giggling too. And then we all started moving forward, to the entrance of the Bailey Gifford Main Theater. The Doors were open and the Gig was on. 
 
We took our seats, the lights dimmed and in walked the hero of the evening. We all warmed to him straight away, Our interviewer of the night was the very charming and funny Serene Fields, The opening theme was Mr Welsh’s new book. The Sex Lives Of Siamese twins Ms Fields was very knowledgeable of Irvine’s new release and she expertly asked the questions that would get the beloved author waxing lyrical about how he got the inspiration for the characters of  his Novel, set in Miami, Florida. Tales of Voodo and bikinis, Keep Fit instructors with the physiques of speed freaks. Mr Welsh had us all in the palm of his hand.
 
 
jpeg
 
 
Instead of promoting his new book, Irvine Welsh had the most amazing of treats for us, he wanted to debut the beginnings of a new novel that he is in the process of writing. Wow! Before that though, we had a lot of time for questions from the audience. Linda, my new friend was bubbling with excitement as the microphone was passed to her sons girlfriend so that she could ask a question. The audience loved it and the reply to her question about The Hibernian Football Team, got a round of applause. Indeed Irvine Welsh is a Son Of Edinburgh.  Then the seminal reading of his new novel and amazing exclusive to this hour in the presence of genius. Confessions Of  A Taxi Driving Porn Star In Edinburgh. I have a feeling that what we experienced tonight was the beginning a of stage play.
 
Irvine Welsh enacted all the parts, One could tell that when he wrote this. His heart was longing for home. Welcome Home Irvine. Something very special happened tonight. A brilliant hour of Legendary entertainment.Divine is feeling blessed. Its meaningful. Another masterclass.
 
 
 
Mark ‘Divine’ Calvert