THE PEOPLE’S FRINGE: Edinburgh 2020

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August 7th-23rd


After much soul-searching & debate, the Mumble Team have decided that they will be launching a Fringe programme this August if the current climate of social distancing has evaporated. We will also be supplying free tickets for NHS workers as a way of saying thank-you. The Fringe just needs to happen, & with the ethos being one of Open Access, The Mumble are prepared to step up to the plate & keep the Fringe flag flying high.

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THE PEOPLE’S FRINGE is a chance to get back to the roots, to 1947 at the start of it all before it became the corporate behemoth of 2019. A certain quote has been banded around the media recently from theatre director Gerard Slevin, who argued in 1961, when the event was less than 15 years old & already starting to swell in size, it would be, “much better if only ten halls were licensed”.

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So, that is just what The Mumble will be curating this August; ten venues, dedicated to one of the art forms, & sponsored by Mumble Theatre, Mumble Comedy, Mumble Cirque & others. Our Mumble Words venue will step into the spheres the Book Festival. Being based in Edinburgh all year round, we are perfectly placed to make it all happen, & its kind of duty to do so, a fringe for the people, THE PEOPLE’S FRINGE.

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The Coronavirus may be assaulting the body, but the spirit of the Fringe is immune, & when all gets back to normal – as it surely will -, then the world will once more be able to find cheer, inspiration, hope & solace in an Edinburgh summer festival for the arts.

Love, Wine & Nature in the Ever-living China I: Feng Love Poems

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Shen Zhou

With the Coronavirus kicking in the global lock-down, its time for everyone to reflect & maybe look at projects that have been lying gathering dust for a while. In my case its the compilation of the very best of a certain William Dolby’s translations of ancient Chinese poetry. A brilliant, extremely prolofic man, Dolby has unfortunately passed away, leaving his son as the custodian of his works. Last year I contacted said son, Ieuan, who very kindly sent me a few books – about 8 in total.

I am now in the process of diving into thoise 8 books & digging out the nuggets, all of which I am collating under the umbrella term, LOVE, WINE & NATURE IN THE EVER-LIVING CHINA. The idea is to provide a poetic hotline to a most wonderful time of humanity – millennia before the technocracies in which we dwell. I hope the readers of Mumble Words will deligth as much as I have in Dolby’s genius – I will be changing the word of two here & there, & scribble out stanzas as well, leading to a final result which I believe will benefit the world a great deal.

The first selection of poems are being made from the ‘SHI-CHING,‘ (tr. songs-lyric-warp/weave), China’s earliest poetry anthology. It was compiled c.500 BC in the age of Confucious, who many scholars believe composed new music for the songs. Drawn from all the regions of ancient China, the oldest material goes back to the Shang Dynasty (1766-1122 BC) & are a mixture of court songs, war songs, & of course romantic numbers. It is of the latter sort,l known as the Feng (folk-love-songs) that we shall begin what will become a long essay into Chinese poetry, the culmination of which should be a brand new anthology for the 21st century. The names under the titles, by the way, are the region from where the song was drawn.

 


CURLY EARS
Chou South

Cull & cull the Curly Ears – cerastium,
Don’t fill my lopsided shallow-fronted basket;
Sighing for the one I’m yearning for in my breast,
I put it aside, leave it on the Chou Road.

I go up into the rock-strewn hills,
Till my horses are ill with exhaustion;
For a while I pour wine from the rhinoceros-horn jar,
To stop myself from greiving on & on.

I go up onto the rocky earth-hill summit,
Till my horses are sick with the effort;
My charioteer is poorly now,
&, oh, how I’m sighing now.

GATHERING THE WHITE DAISIES
Shao South

Where is she going to gather the fecund white daisy?
She’s going to the pools & the islets;
Where is she going to employ them?
In the sacriificial services of her lord.

Where is she going to gather the fecund white daisy?
She’s going in among the mountain brooks’
Where is she going to employ them?
In the palace of her lord.

She has an abundance of hair-jewels,
In the pre-dawn she’s with her lord;
She has such a luxuriance of hair-jewels,
As she turns back & goes home.

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THE WIND
Pei

There’s wind, & its violent, moreover,
When you look around at me, you smile,
Your jokes are wild & your laughter scorching,
& deep in my heart I lament over that!

There’s wind & its flying dusr filling the air, moreover,
Its a favour when you agree to come to me!
If you don’t come & go with me,
I long for you endlessly.

There’s wind, & its overcast, moreover,
No sun, & overcast.
When I go to bed, I stay awake, don;t sleep,
Longing for you, I keep on sneezing.

The cloud-covered skies are dark overcast,
The thunder rumbles loud.

LIFE-GIVING EASTERN BREEZE
Pei

The life-giving eastern breeze gently shushes,
Bringing overcast skies & rain;
I strove to be your soul-mate,
You shouldn’t have got angry with me.
When you pick radishes & turnips,
Don;t you include their roots!
If you hadn’t gone against the love between us,
I’d have died together with you at the same time as you die.

I travel the road slowly tarrying,
Deep inside my heart unwilling;
Not a long way, indeed a short onw,
You only saw me off to the threshold of your door!
Who says that the sow-thistle is bitter!
Its as sweet as shepherd’s purse;
You rejoice in your new bride,
As if she were your elder or younger brother!

Alas you didn’t have affection for me,
But on the contrary treated me as an enemy;
Since you warded off my goodwill,
What I was selling wouldn’t sell.
In the old days, I lived in nervousness & at the end of my resources
When you tumbl’d into calamity;
When we’d survived that & flourish’d,
You liken’d me to poison.

I had some fine dried vegetables in store,
Which, to be sure, were to guard against the winter,
You rejoice in your new bride,
& used me to gaurd against hard times.
You were rough, you were wildly enraged,
& you had me hard toil;
You didn’t recall the old days,
When you & I were in love!

OMO: Lesson 7 – Basic Sentences & Syntax

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The panting, light-brown dog – who is very hungry – will happily eat his dug-up bone – which he buried last week


OK troops- so we’ve got ourselves a lovely wee vocab so far, including numbers & a whole heap of cool words to link them all together. That means we’re ready for our first sentence, which of course will be constructed thro OMO syntax, the procedure of which is to be  examin’d in this lesson.

On top of basic interpersonal relationships, a language needs to be able to interpret, refer, enquire, reflect, and other such actions. To achieve as much the core of each declarative sentence shall be based around what is known as the SVO principle – i.e. a word order of Subject + Verb + Object.

A sentence is divided into subject (a person, thing, or topic about which something is said) and predicate (that which is said about the subject), which might be the verb – ‘Jack is playing’ – the object ‘ Jack’s ball’ or both – ‘Jack is playing with the ball.’ For this lesson we shall be constructing our sentences around a core subject-verb-object of ‘DOG-EAT-BONE.’

The overall effect of the SVO principle is rather like the medieval tryptych, from which identification we might call each step a panel, rendering the three steps; subject panel, verb panel & object panel. As with all art, some tryptychs & panesl are more decorative than others, & are open to several levels of development.

Dog              Eat                   Bone

Ko-Ta            Ka-Ma-Va         Mo-Mo-Me

At first glance/experience, it may appear as if there is a lot of OMO action for just three English syllables – but a seasoned OMO speaker will utter the words with concision almost matching the speed of their native language.

It is now time to start playing with, & elaborating upon, the core idea. First things first, we need to add begin with the bridge conjunction doucon, ‘KT,’ meaning ‘the’ or ‘a.’ This means we now have;

The      Dog           Eat                     Bone

KT……..  Ko-Ta…      Ka-Ma-Va…        Mo-Mo-Ma


Panel One: Subject

With Omo, as with the Latin languages, descriptions always follow the word it is describing,  – thus brown dog as said in English is described as dog brown. It is better to let the hierarchy of thought concentrate on the main subject.

If we want to add texture to the description, this developmental word follows the initial description word, thus delicious boiled egg would have the word order EGG – BOILED – DELICIOUS. With colours, however, to indicate a deep or a paler shade simply posify or negify the word, thus light brown enters into the examplar as;

The      Dog       Light-Brown

KT…      Ko-Ta…  TM-Va-Na-Ka

After the subject is described, we should then include the subordinate verb, which in the case of our dog is ‘panting.’ 

The      Dog        Light-Brown         Panting

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Na-Ca…     Me-Le-Ta

Although not included in our example, it is also possible to describe the subordinate verb, such as ‘panting hard,’ with the word appearing after the verb as with all descriptions. Dog – Brown – Light – Panting – Hard.


Panel Two: Verb

Returning to our sentence, let us turn not to the second panel, & the primary verb, ‘Eat’. This word is a branch of Food/Ka-ma, & adding the past-tense fyre ‘twig’ gives us VT-Ka-Ma-Va. We then discover that our dog that our dog ‘happily eat(s).’ To create ‘happily’ two new words we need to verbify the word happy, i.e. adding ‘M-M’ to ‘Ka-Me-To.’

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting      Happily               Eat(s)

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…  MM-Ka-Me-To…  Ka-Ma-Va

The next development is the introduction of the modal verb will – TOE. It is also possible to future-tensify the word eat with a doucon (TV-KA-MA-VA), but in this lesson we’ll be focussing on the modal, to-be, ‘will’ version.

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting      

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…

Will       Eat                Happily

 Toe…     Ka-Ma-Va…   MM-Ka-Me-To.


Panel Three: Object

It is now time to analyze the third panel of our tryptych, the object, which is in this case a bone. First things first, we must connect the bone to the dog with the possessive ‘his‘ – LOE.

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat his bone.

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting      

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…

Will       Happily               Eat                His     Bone

 Toe…     MM-Ka-Me-To…  Ka-Ma-Va…   Loe…   Mo-Mo-Ma

Let us develop even further here, by describing the bone with the past tense dug-up. There is no actual word for dug-up in OMO, but in the given context it will be easily understood.

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat his dug-up bone

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting         Will       Happily

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…     Toe…     MM-Ka-Me-To…

Eat                 His     Bone               Dug (up)

Ka-Ma-Va…   Loe…   Mo-Mo-Ma…    VT-Ka-Ve-Vo


Relative Clauses

Now for the fun part, the relative clauses. They begin with questions such as where & when, & pronouns such as from. They are most often used to define or identify the subject or object that precedes them. For the examplar we’re gonna be using two of these bad boys in order to create a rather volumous first ever sentence in OMO.

The panting, light-brown dog WHO IS VERY HUNGRY – will happily eat his old, dug-up bone – WHICH HE BURIED LAST WEEK.

The word for both who & which is KAO. The word for is/are is AE. Very Hungry is created by posifying (TL) Hungry (Ko-Ke-Le), creating TL-Ko-Ke-Le.  In the second of the relative clauses, the word for He or him is LEO, the past tense of Bury is VT-Ka-Ve-Ve, the word last is that signified by previous – Va-Ka-Ke – & finally the word for week is Me-Te-Te.

Who…          Is…                Very…          Hungry…

KAO              AE                 TL                 Ko-Ke-Lo

Which…    He…     Buried…          Last…          Week…

KAO          LEO      VT-Ka-Ve-Ve     Va-Ka-Ke     Me-Te-Te

Okeydokes (which I’m not translating into OMO), so we now have our very first sentence, with lots of little nuances to show the flexibility of the language, the final version of which is;

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat his dug-up bone

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…   

Who…          Is…                Very…          Hungry…      Will

KAO              AE                 TL                 Ko-Ke-Lo       Toe…

Happily             Eat                 His     Bone               Dug (up)

MM-Ka-Me-To…   Ka-Ma-Va…   Loe…   Mo-Mo-Ma…    VT-Ka-Ve-Vo

Which…    He…     Buried…          Last…          Week…

KAO          LEO      VT-Ka-Ve-Ve     Va-Ka-Ke     Me-Te-Te


New Word Hoards

I hope that was an instructive enough lesson to get a basic grips of how to communicate thro’ OMO. To conclude this lesson I’d like to show you where each word fits into the overall vocabulary.  In the last post I explained how I would be disseminating the trunk words through the interglobal community, & as we hit the word hordes I shall be sending them to the east to languages like Korean & Tamil.

COLOUR: Va-Ma
Sanskrit = Varna

Va-Ma-Va : Rainbow
Va-Ma-Vo: Red
Va-Ma-Ve: Pink
Va-Ma-Ma: Burgundy / Claret
Va-Ma-Mo: Blue
Va-Ma-Me: Purple
Va-Ma-Ta: Black
Va-Ma-To: White
Va-Ma-Te: Grey
Va-Na-Ka: Brown
Va-Na-Ko: Beige
Va-Ma-Ke: Cream
Va-Ma-La: Green
Va-Ma-Lo: Yellow
Va-Ma-Le: Orange

SPEECH: Me-Le
Malayalam = Meāḻi

Me-Le-Va: Voice
Me-Le-Vo: Articulate
Me-Le-Ve: Eloquent
Me-Le-Ma: Stutter
Me-Le-Mo: Babble
Me-Le-Me: Incoherent
Me-Le-Ta: Pant
Me-Le-To: Breathe
Me-Le-Te: Whisper
Me-Le-Ko: Accent
Me-Le-Ka: Fluent
Me-Le-Ke: Expression / Phrase
Me-Le-La: Scream
Me-Le-Lo: Shout
Me-Le-Le: Conversation

DOG: Ko-Ta
Hindi = Kutta

Ko-Ta-Va: Breed
Ko-Ta-Vo: Mongrel / Mix
Ko-Ta-Ve: Thoroughbred / Purebreed
Ko-Ta-Ma: Terrier
Ko-Ta-Mo: Lhasssa Apso
Ko-Ta-Me: Chihuauau
Ko-Ta-Ta: Poodle
Ko-Ta-To: Spaniel
Ko-Ta-Te: Retreiver
Ko-Ta-Ko: Rottweiler
Ko-Ta-Ka: Alsatian
Ko-Ta-Ke: Wolf
Ko-Ta-La: Greyhound
Ko-Ta-Lo: Bulldog
Ko-Ta-Le: Shitzu

PHYSICAL CONDITION: Ko-Ke
Japanese = Choshi

The negified word follows in brackets; Sharp (Co-Ce-Ve) becomes Blunt (TM-Ko-Ke-Ve).

Ko-Ke-Va: Hard (Soft)
Ko-Ke-Vo: Strong (Weak/Soft)
Ko-Ke-Ve: Sharp (Blunt)
Ko-Ke-Ma: Flexible (Inflexible)
Ko-Ke-Mo: Tight (Loose)
Ko-Ke-Me: Stuck (Unstuck)
Ko-Ke-Ta: Smooth (Rough)
Ko-Ke-To: Tidy (Messy)
Ko-Ke-Te: Wet (Dry)
Ko-Ke-Ko: Flat (Uneven)
Ko-Ke-Ka: Balanced (Unbalanced)
Ko-Ke-Ke: Still (Active)
Ko-Ke-La: Thirsty
Ko-Ke-Lo: Hungry
Ko-Ke-Le: Tired

POSITIVE MANNER: Ca-Me
Korean = Gamejong

Ka-Me-Va: Enthusiastic
Ka-Me-Vo: Optimistic
Ka-Me-Ve: Confident
Ka-Me-Ma: Dignified / Elegant
Ka-Me-Mo: Generous
Ka-Me-Me: xxxxxxx
Ka-Me-Ta: Pleased
Ka-Me-To: Happy
Ka-Me-Te: Silly/Giddy
Ka-Me-Ko: Humble
Ka-Me-Ka: Compassionate
Ka-Me-Ke: xxxxxxx
Ka-Me-La: Kind
Ka-Me-Lo: Charitable
Ka-Me-Le: Helpful

FOOD – Ka-Ma
Hindi = Khaana

Ka-Ma-Va: Eat
Ka-Ma-Vo: Swallow
Ka-Ma-Voe: Chew
Ka-Ma-Ma: Meal
Ka-Ma-Mo: Soup
Ka-Ma-Me: Dish – Recipe
Ka-Ma-Ta: Rice
Ka-Ma-To: Pasta
Ka-Ma-Te: Noodles
Ka-Ma-Ka: Chips / Fries
Ka-Ma-Ko: Cereal
Ka-Ma-Ke: Nuts
Ka-Ma-La: Sandwich
Ka-Ma-Lo: Wrap – Kebab
Ka-Ma-Le: Burger

PHYSICAL ACTION: Ka-Ve
Hindi = Kaary

Ka-Ve-Va: Place / Affix
Ka-Ve-Vo: Dig
Ka-Ve-Ve: Bury
Ka-Ve-Ma: Spread
Ka-Ve-Mo: Push
Ka-Ve-Me: Pull
Ka-Ve-Ta: Hook
Ka-Ve-To: Fold
Ka-Ve-Te: Bend
Ka-Ve-Lo: Catch
Ka-Ve-Ka: Drop
Ka-Ve-Ke: Lift
Ka-Ve-La: Tie
Ka-Ve-Lo: Put
Ka-Ve-Le: Spray

BODY, INTERNAL: Mo-Mo
Korean = Mom

Mo-Mo-Va: Skeleton
Mo-Mo-Vo: Spine
Mo-Mo-Ve: Ribs
Mo-Mo-Ma: Bone
Mo-Mo-Mo: Blood
Mo-Mo-Me: Muscle
Mo-Mo-Ta: Flesh
Mo-Mo-To: Sweat
Mo-Mo-Te: Digestive System
Mo-Mo-Ka: Vomit
Mo-Mo-Ko: Burps
Mo-Mo-Ke: Fart / Flatulance
Mo-Mo-La: Poo / Defacate
Mo-Mo-Lo: Pee / Urinate
Mo-Mo-Le: Diarrhea

SEQUENCE: Va-Ka
Tamil = Varicai

Va-Ka-Va: Last
Va-Ka-Vo: Ultimate
Va-Ka-Ve: After
Va-Ka-Ma: Series
Va-Ka-Mo: Repeat
Va-Ka-Me: Progression
Va-Ka-Ta: Initial
Va-Ka-To: Before
Va-Ka-Te: First
Va-Ka-Ka: Penultimate
Va-Ka-Ko: Next
Va-Ka-Ke: Previous
Va-Ka-La: Between
Va-Ka-Lo: Middle
Va-Ka-Le: Queue

DAY (date) – Me-Te
Nepalese = Miti

Me-Te-Va: Monday
Me-Te-Vo: Tuesday
Me-Te-Ve: Wednesday
Me-Te-Ma: Thursday
Me-Te-Mo: Friday
Me-Te-Me: Saturday
Me-Te-Ta: Sunday
Me-Te-To: Weekend
Me-Te-Te: Week
Me-Te-Ka: Today
Me-Te-Ko: Tomorrow
Me-Te-Ke: Yesterday
Me-Te-La: Day After Tomorrow
Me-Te-Lo: x
Me-Te-Le: x

OMO: Lesson 6 – First Word Hoards

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An auxiliary language is essential, one wee phrase book to be anywhere in the world, a language simple enough for anyone to learn but complex enough to 8handle most situations. There are limits to OMO, but the limits were very much intended in order to open it up to the wider population of the world. Better to obtain mastery in a new, equal-for-all & quite finite language, than learn a complicated alien tongue as if one’s mind were a mere colony of an imperial power.

It is very difficult to get people to switch habits. A child in Botswana cannot be expected to learn the complexities of English or Mandarin, for example, two of the most widely spoken tongues. Learning a new language is a difficult task, but I hope to present to the world a simple to learn, easy to communicate universal language. Auxiliary in consistence, it is complex enough to facilitate huge swathes of our Human interactions, but not so complex as to prohibit its learning to proficiency by the general masses of the planet.

We are on our way, however, & it is time to get into the nuts & bolts of OMO, the main vocab. As mentioned in Lesson 3, when combining the 15 core sounds into ‘double onset’ pairs, we can create 225 different words such as Le-Lo & Va-Me, with the stress being made on the first syllable, rendering the two examples Lee-lo & Vay-me. These 225 words constitute a basic strata, a primordial phonology, on which human communication may exist utilising words such as ‘book,’ ‘computer’ & ‘meat.’ In this lesson we shall look at three Trunk words & their 15 branches,supplying us with 45 new ‘triple onset’ words to learn, plus their fyres. That there are hints of the English language in these root words. I felt that this method would negate Karl Haag’s criticism of how artificial languages create their lexicon, when he wrote;

It is precisely because artificial languages randomly accumulate the plundered detritus which forms their core, that, from a logical point of view, they are fundamentally inferior to real and historically-attested languages; they often destroy both the logic and the aesthetic beauty of any inner conceptual interconnection and elaboration which, thanks to the root words, permeate a natural language when it is allowed to grow naturally, and they thus offend the mind as much as the sensitivities.

As we proceed through the Lexicon, the root word phonetics shall be dispensed across the many languages of the planet, thus creating a vocabulary that has commonality with almost every tongue on the planet. Esperanto & Ido, for example, have mainly stemmed from European languages like Latin, Spanish, French, German, and English, which precludes them from two thirds of the world obtaining at least the hint that I attempting to provide.


ALCOHOL: La-Co

Language is essentially expressions and sentences are deeply rooted in the real world, & more or less everybody loves a drink. Before we look at the rest of its word hoard, lets see how fyers may be applied to the word for alcohol.

M-M-La-Co: To do Alcohol is essentially getting drunk
V-K-La-Co: To personify Alcohol is to deem somebody an alcoholic. In each instance here the ‘la’ element would be stressed and sound as ‘laay.’

With branch words, the stress comes with the middle syllable, so whiskey is pronounced something like Lay-Coor-Ve.

La-Co-Va: Brandy
La-Co-Vo: Whiskey
La-Co-Ve: Wine
La-Co-Ma: Rum
La-Co-Mo: Saki / Rice Wine
La-Co-Me: Stout / Guinness
La-Co-Ta: Gin
La-Co-To: Vodka
La-Co-Te: Tequila
La-Co-Co: Ale
La-Co-Ca: Cider
La-Co-Ce: Home Brew / Moonshine
La-Co-La: Bubbly (Champagne / Prosecco)
La-Co-Lo: Baileys / Irish Cream
La-Co-Le: Beer / Lager

Like Alcohol, the sport of Athletics is a truly international entity, & one which would benefit from a universal language. An athlete would then be a V-K-Le-Te, with the ‘le’ sounding like ‘lee.’


ATHLETICS: Le-Te

Le-Te-Va: Olympics
Le-Te-Vo: Track
Le-Te-Ve: Field
Le-Te-Ma: Race
Le-Te-Mo: Marathon
Le-Te-Me: Relay
Le-Te-Ca: Long jump
Le-Te-Co: High jump
Le-Te-Ce: Triple jump
Le-Te-Ta: Shot put
Le-Te-Ta: Javelin
Le-Te-Ta: Discus
Le-Te-La: National anthem
Le-Te-Lo: Medal
Le-Te-Le: Podium

Continuing the theme that a useful auxiliary language must have a vocabulary drawn from universal themes and every day occurrences, our final root word of the lesson is TOOL, pronounced TO-LO. These are objects, so Tools is T-T-To-Lo & Screwdrivers are T-T-To-Lo.


TOOLS (To-Lo)

To-Lo-Va: Drill
To-Lo-Vo: Saw
To-Lo-Ve: Measuring tape
To-Lo-Ma: Sandpaper
To-Lo-Mo: Nails
To-Lo-Me: Screw
To-Lo-Ca: Screwdriver
To-Lo-Co: Hammer
To-Lo-Ce: Spirit level
To-Lo-Ta: Bolt
To-Lo-To: Nut
To-Lo-Te: Washer
To-Lo-La: Scissors
To-Lo-Lo: Spade
To-Lo-Le: Wrench

To conlcude this lesson, it is the using of 2 or 3 syllable words with stress which allows for an easy understanding & a natural separation of words by the mind. This system also taps into the origins of language, for both Vedic Sanskrit & ancient Greek possess a similar system of accentuation in which pitch is dominant. That’s gotta be a good thing, right?

OMO: Lesson 5 – Prime Words, Doucons And Fyers

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Without further ado let us now introduce the word families based upon the Consonant-Vowel-Vowel construct. This gives us 5 blocks, then, each of which consists of six words. The five blocks have been distributed through the most important preopositions & conjunctions – the glue which holds sentences together – alongside such significant words as Questions & the Modal Verbs.  Thus the whole C-V-V section can be considered as vital to Human communication, & should be considered as prime words. When pronouncing these words, the stress should fall on the first vowel; so in the case of CAO, it would sound like ‘caay-oh.’

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QUESTIONS

When speaking Omo, the stress always falls in the early sections of an individual word. This opens the possibility of allowing a raised stress at the end a word to imply the context of a question being asked. Alternatively, just use these curt babies!

CAO – Who / Which
COA – When
CEA – How
CAE – Why
CEO – Where
COE – What

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PRIME CONJUNCTIONS

LAE – And
LEA – But
LOE – Or
LEO – Nor
LAO – So
LOA – Yet

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MODAL VERB

A modal verb is a type of verb that is used to indicate modality – that is: likelihood, ability, permission, request, capacity, suggestions, order, obligation, or advice.

TAE: Can
TEA: Could
TOE: Will
TEO: Would
TOA: Shall
TAO: Should

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PREPOSITIONS OF PLACE

Place prepositions are a rigid bunch that really do fix other mimesi/words in position. Note I have done away with the nuances of on (the table), at (the disco). From this defusion of confusion, one should understand exactly what is meant by the context in which the statement is made.

MAE: On, At
MEA: Around/About
MOE: Between
MEO: Against
MAO: In, Inside
MOA: Outside

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PREPOSITIONS OF TIME

As with the Prepositions of Place, I have done away with the nuances of at (5PM), on (the 6th of June) & in (ten minutes). Again, one should understand what is meant by the context. With the word VOE, again context will dictate meaning. Even then, the shades of difference in meaning are also so subtle that there should be no mistakes in understanding.

VAO: Before / Since
VOA: After
VEA: Approximately
VAE: At / On / In
VEO: Until
VOE: For / During / Throughout / While

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Another section of the conjunction word-types, along with what are known as fyers, have been allocated to the Doucons, a word which means double consonant. In essence, these are the ‘twigs’ which shoot out of branch words & trunk words. Examples of these rapidly spoken entities are the T-T doucon, which sounds something like ‘ter-ter’ & the K-M doucon, pronounced ‘ker-mer.’

MOVEMENT CONJUNCTION

ML: Across
MK: Over
MT: Pass
MV: Towards

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BRIDGE CONJUNCTION

KM: To
KL: For
KT: The / A
KV: Of

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CONDITIONAL CONJUNCTION

LM: If
LK: Unless
LT: Although
LV: Despite

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FYERS

In the case of a Fyer doucon, these are affixed to the start of a word in order to modify its meaning. Examples of each fyer are given in brackets

T-T: plurify (dog to dogs)
M-M: verbify (swim to swimming)
L-L: Objectify (the game football to a football)
V-V: Adjectify (charity to charitable)
K-K: adverbify (quick to quickly)

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TM: negify (small to tiny)
TK: Anti (happy to unhappy)
TL: posify (strong to mighty)
TV: future tense (play to will play)

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VM: comparify (tall to taller)
VK: personify (farm to farmer)
VT: past tense (run to ran)
VL: intensify (smart to smartest)

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The use of the negator prefix T-K allows us to dispense with hundreds, if not thousands of negative-themed words, which means less words to learn overall! the presence of the negative marker at the beginning of the word is also in a global majority. Under the umbrella comes sane & insane, lead & mislead, etc..

OMO: Lesson 4 – Numbers

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The global understanding of numbers presented as 1-9 & so on is the closest to a universal communication system possessed by our species. The alphabet of OMO affords a near-perfect way of representing numbers. The name of each number is given in the vowel-consonant-vowel format. The word for one is Omo, which is also the name of the entire language. The significance is that the Human race will become as one when it speaks a universal language. OMO also transchispers into Homo, a Latin word that means human. This word derives comes from the Greek word homos, meaning the same.

Let us begin with the numbers one to ten, which are written as follows;

1: OMO
2: EMO
3: OKO
4: EKO
5: OVO
6: EVO
7: OTO
8: ETO
9: OLO
10: ELO

When counting to ten, flipping between the word-opening O & E sounds is somewhat quite pleasing on the ear. As you can see the ending of all numbers is ‘O’ which is the unique quality that marks it out as a number. If this letter were changed to an ‘E’ or an ‘A’ then the meaning of the word changes to either a position or a fraction. Thus EKO, 4, becomes OKE, fourth, & EKA, a quarter. The only exception is no such fraction as 1, so this word – OMA – we shall designate as zero.

The final set of numbers are known as ‘brackets,’ & reflect of each fresh numerical level, and the adding of a new zero. Their meanings are as follows;

AMO: Hundred
AKO: Thousand
AVO: Tens of Thousands
ATO: Hundreds of Thousands
ALO: Million

Like the first ten numbers, this new set may also be altered by the final vowel, creating words like AVE – the thousandth – & ALA – a millionth (of). There is no room for the word, billion or trillion here, I’m afraid, not yet anyway. I mean, its not like its in every day use, is it? ‘Excuse me, can I have a billion onions please? We’ll get by without them for now.

So, how are OMO’s numbers actually spoken? Well, numbers between 11 & 99 are simply the two visible numbers spoken unlinked, as in omo-omo (11) & olo-olo (99). A round decade, like thirty, is said 3-zero, & thus in this case, ‘oko-elo’. To state a decade of numbers, like the 70s, you simply pluralise the number (see lesson x).

Once we start getting into the bigger numbers, the largest is mentioned first followed by how many of them, ie 500 hundred is said as AKO-OVO (hundred five). If the number is something like 582, then you would say AVO-OKO as before, followed by each number, here 8 then 2, resulting in AVO-OVO-ETO-EMO. It is also possible to dispense with the formal introduction of the numberscape via the bracket & simply say the numbers in sequence, tho once you reach tens of thousands & beyond it is probably better to introduce the bracket.

Lelo amo-evo-evo = Route 66

In the case of three hundred & twenty-eight thousand, seven hundred & sixty five (328765) you will say; ATO-EKO (hundreds of thousands x 3) then EMO-ETO-OTO-EVO-OVO (28765). There are nuances I haven’t covered here, but the general schema is on the table & I do believe it works. Thus four lessons in we can differentiate between people & also understand who owns what. We can also count, which in a weird way reflects the mercantile dna inherent in Human Kind. But we are beadcounting cavedwellers no longer, & its time we had a wee gossip or summat. But before we go I’d like to introduce what is called an ‘Objectifyer,’ which places the double consonant L-L directly before a number to create ‘second, third, etc.’ First has its own word which we’ll come to in the seventh lesson.

Second: LL-EMO
Third: LL-OKO
Tenth: LL-ELO

OMO: Lesson 3 – Word Construction

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So, on with the course. Having established the script of OMO, we can now assemble the core sounds. Combining the five consonants with the three syllables gives us fifteen possible core sounds being;

ME – MO – MA
VE – VO – VA
KE – KO – KA
LE – LO – LA
TE – TO – TA

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These core sounds, or ‘morphemes,’ are never used individually to create a word. The creation of the vocabulary begins when we add two core sounds together. These combinations create 225 different words such as Le-Lo & Va-Me, the idea being that they constitute a basic strata, a primordial phonology, on which human communication may exist utilising words such as ‘book,’ ‘computer’ & ‘meat.’ There is no scope for intelligent conversation, per se, but there will be enough variety & flexibility in these 225 words to form a general & global sense of understanding. This level provides enough communication to survive & interact in life, & may transpose easily into a situation where we find ourselves in any non-native lingual area.

When designing a universal language, I understood that it should inherently contain layered levels of proficiency to reflect the natural acquistion of language. Like infants we first learn the sounds, then create a word pool to enable communication with our family members & playtime friends. After establishing this skill-set, & as the infant brain is enabled with greater powers of speech, the natural instinct for Humans is to converse. To facilitate this, each basic word then becomes a trunk for 15 new compound words, which are all connected familially to each other through the trunk. Linguists have a word for this kind of synthetic language, ‘agglutinative,’ derived from the Latin verb agglutinare, which means “to glue together”.

There are four sets of words that differ from this general schema,the first being six basic words consisiting of two vowels only. When pronouncing them the main stress should be on e first vowel, such as E-A sounding like eee-ay. These are;

AE : Is/are
EA: IS  Not/Are Not

OE : Yes
EO : No

OA : With
AO : Without

The other three sets to differ from the principle schema are; (1) the numbers, formed from a vowel-consonant-vowel combination, (2) Linking words like prepositions & conjunctions (see next lesson); & (3) the pronouns & possessive pronouns such as ‘you’ & ‘yours.’ The latter group are created from the 30-strong word pool formed by the diphthongean ‘consonant-vowel-vowel’ combination. Not all of the 30 possibilities have been utilised, which should ensure ease of understanding. Note how some words represent several of shades of the core meaning, subject-object superfluities which may be dismissed to ensure a smoother running of the Unversal langauge.

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PRONOUNS

MEO – Me, I
VEO – You
KEO – We, Us
TEO – They, Them, Those
LEO – Him, He
LEA – She, Her

POSSESSIVES

MOE – Mine
VOE – Yours
KOE – Ours
TOE – Theirs
LOE – His
LOA – Hers

A simple study of the 12 words will show immediately how the pronouns & the possessive pronouns are different yet phonetically similar. Keep it in the family to speak. So, have a pop at learning & sayong aloud these 12 words & speak OMO for the first time in your life. If you’re inclined to stress sounds within words, then press a little on the first vowel please, but in this OMO instance stress is not important. However, for the rest of the lexcion stress plays an important part…