OMO: Lesson 7 – Basic Sentences & Syntax

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The panting, light-brown dog – who is very hungry – will happily eat his dug-up bone – which he buried last week


OK troops- so we’ve got ourselves a lovely wee vocab so far, including numbers & a whole heap of cool words to link them all together. That means we’re ready for our first sentence, which of course will be constructed thro OMO syntax, the procedure of which is to be  examin’d in this lesson.

On top of basic interpersonal relationships, a language needs to be able to interpret, refer, enquire, reflect, and other such actions. To achieve as much the core of each declarative sentence shall be based around what is known as the SVO principle – i.e. a word order of Subject + Verb + Object.

A sentence is divided into subject (a person, thing, or topic about which something is said) and predicate (that which is said about the subject), which might be the verb – ‘Jack is playing’ – the object ‘ Jack’s ball’ or both – ‘Jack is playing with the ball.’ For this lesson we shall be constructing our sentences around a core subject-verb-object of ‘DOG-EAT-BONE.’

The overall effect of the SVO principle is rather like the medieval tryptych, from which identification we might call each step a panel, rendering the three steps; subject panel, verb panel & object panel. As with all art, some tryptychs & panesl are more decorative than others, & are open to several levels of development.

Dog              Eat                   Bone

Ko-Ta            Ka-Ma-Va         Mo-Mo-Me

At first glance/experience, it may appear as if there is a lot of OMO action for just three English syllables – but a seasoned OMO speaker will utter the words with concision almost matching the speed of their native language.

It is now time to start playing with, & elaborating upon, the core idea. First things first, we need to add begin with the bridge conjunction doucon, ‘KT,’ meaning ‘the’ or ‘a.’ This means we now have;

The      Dog           Eat                     Bone

KT……..  Ko-Ta…      Ka-Ma-Va…        Mo-Mo-Ma


Panel One: Subject

With Omo, as with the Latin languages, descriptions always follow the word it is describing,  – thus brown dog as said in English is described as dog brown. It is better to let the hierarchy of thought concentrate on the main subject.

If we want to add texture to the description, this developmental word follows the initial description word, thus delicious boiled egg would have the word order EGG – BOILED – DELICIOUS. With colours, however, to indicate a deep or a paler shade simply posify or negify the word, thus light brown enters into the examplar as;

The      Dog       Light-Brown

KT…      Ko-Ta…  TM-Va-Na-Ka

After the subject is described, we should then include the subordinate verb, which in the case of our dog is ‘panting.’ 

The      Dog        Light-Brown         Panting

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Na-Ca…     Me-Le-Ta

Although not included in our example, it is also possible to describe the subordinate verb, such as ‘panting hard,’ with the word appearing after the verb as with all descriptions. Dog – Brown – Light – Panting – Hard.


Panel Two: Verb

Returning to our sentence, let us turn not to the second panel, & the primary verb, ‘Eat’. This word is a branch of Food/Ka-ma, & adding the past-tense fyre ‘twig’ gives us VT-Ka-Ma-Va. We then discover that our dog that our dog ‘happily eat(s).’ To create ‘happily’ two new words we need to verbify the word happy, i.e. adding ‘M-M’ to ‘Ka-Me-To.’

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting      Happily               Eat(s)

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…  MM-Ka-Me-To…  Ka-Ma-Va

The next development is the introduction of the modal verb will – TOE. It is also possible to future-tensify the word eat with a doucon (TV-KA-MA-VA), but in this lesson we’ll be focussing on the modal, to-be, ‘will’ version.

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting      

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…

Will       Eat                Happily

 Toe…     Ka-Ma-Va…   MM-Ka-Me-To.


Panel Three: Object

It is now time to analyze the third panel of our tryptych, the object, which is in this case a bone. First things first, we must connect the bone to the dog with the possessive ‘his‘ – LOE.

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat his bone.

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting      

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…

Will       Happily               Eat                His     Bone

 Toe…     MM-Ka-Me-To…  Ka-Ma-Va…   Loe…   Mo-Mo-Ma

Let us develop even further here, by describing the bone with the past tense dug-up. There is no actual word for dug-up in OMO, but in the given context it will be easily understood.

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat his dug-up bone

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting         Will       Happily

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…     Toe…     MM-Ka-Me-To…

Eat                 His     Bone               Dug (up)

Ka-Ma-Va…   Loe…   Mo-Mo-Ma…    VT-Ka-Ve-Vo


Relative Clauses

Now for the fun part, the relative clauses. They begin with questions such as where & when, & pronouns such as from. They are most often used to define or identify the subject or object that precedes them. For the examplar we’re gonna be using two of these bad boys in order to create a rather volumous first ever sentence in OMO.

The panting, light-brown dog WHO IS VERY HUNGRY – will happily eat his old, dug-up bone – WHICH HE BURIED LAST WEEK.

The word for both who & which is KAO. The word for is/are is AE. Very Hungry is created by posifying (TL) Hungry (Ko-Ke-Le), creating TL-Ko-Ke-Le.  In the second of the relative clauses, the word for He or him is LEO, the past tense of Bury is VT-Ka-Ve-Ve, the word last is that signified by previous – Va-Ka-Ke – & finally the word for week is Me-Te-Te.

Who…          Is…                Very…          Hungry…

KAO              AE                 TL                 Ko-Ke-Lo

Which…    He…     Buried…          Last…          Week…

KAO          LEO      VT-Ka-Ve-Ve     Va-Ka-Ke     Me-Te-Te

Okeydokes (which I’m not translating into OMO), so we now have our very first sentence, with lots of little nuances to show the flexibility of the language, the final version of which is;

The panting, light-brown dog will happily eat his dug-up bone

The      Dog        Light-Brown     Panting

KT…      Ko-Ta…   TM-Va-Ma-Ka…  Me-Le-Ta…   

Who…          Is…                Very…          Hungry…      Will

KAO              AE                 TL                 Ko-Ke-Lo       Toe…

Happily             Eat                 His     Bone               Dug (up)

MM-Ka-Me-To…   Ka-Ma-Va…   Loe…   Mo-Mo-Ma…    VT-Ka-Ve-Vo

Which…    He…     Buried…          Last…          Week…

KAO          LEO      VT-Ka-Ve-Ve     Va-Ka-Ke     Me-Te-Te


New Word Hoards

I hope that was an instructive enough lesson to get a basic grips of how to communicate thro’ OMO. To conclude this lesson I’d like to show you where each word fits into the overall vocabulary.  In the last post I explained how I would be disseminating the trunk words through the interglobal community, & as we hit the word hordes I shall be sending them to the east to languages like Korean & Tamil.

COLOUR: Va-Ma
Sanskrit = Varna

Va-Ma-Va : Rainbow
Va-Ma-Vo: Red
Va-Ma-Ve: Pink
Va-Ma-Ma: Burgundy / Claret
Va-Ma-Mo: Blue
Va-Ma-Me: Purple
Va-Ma-Ta: Black
Va-Ma-To: White
Va-Ma-Te: Grey
Va-Na-Ka: Brown
Va-Na-Ko: Beige
Va-Ma-Ke: Cream
Va-Ma-La: Green
Va-Ma-Lo: Yellow
Va-Ma-Le: Orange

SPEECH: Me-Le
Malayalam = Meāḻi

Me-Le-Va: Voice
Me-Le-Vo: Articulate
Me-Le-Ve: Eloquent
Me-Le-Ma: Stutter
Me-Le-Mo: Babble
Me-Le-Me: Incoherent
Me-Le-Ta: Pant
Me-Le-To: Breathe
Me-Le-Te: Whisper
Me-Le-Ko: Accent
Me-Le-Ka: Fluent
Me-Le-Ke: Expression / Phrase
Me-Le-La: Scream
Me-Le-Lo: Shout
Me-Le-Le: Conversation

DOG: Ko-Ta
Hindi = Kutta

Ko-Ta-Va: Breed
Ko-Ta-Vo: Mongrel / Mix
Ko-Ta-Ve: Thoroughbred / Purebreed
Ko-Ta-Ma: Terrier
Ko-Ta-Mo: Lhasssa Apso
Ko-Ta-Me: Chihuauau
Ko-Ta-Ta: Poodle
Ko-Ta-To: Spaniel
Ko-Ta-Te: Retreiver
Ko-Ta-Ko: Rottweiler
Ko-Ta-Ka: Alsatian
Ko-Ta-Ke: Wolf
Ko-Ta-La: Greyhound
Ko-Ta-Lo: Bulldog
Ko-Ta-Le: Shitzu

PHYSICAL CONDITION: Ko-Ke
Japanese = Choshi

The negified word follows in brackets; Sharp (Co-Ce-Ve) becomes Blunt (TM-Ko-Ke-Ve).

Ko-Ke-Va: Hard (Soft)
Ko-Ke-Vo: Strong (Weak/Soft)
Ko-Ke-Ve: Sharp (Blunt)
Ko-Ke-Ma: Flexible (Inflexible)
Ko-Ke-Mo: Tight (Loose)
Ko-Ke-Me: Stuck (Unstuck)
Ko-Ke-Ta: Smooth (Rough)
Ko-Ke-To: Tidy (Messy)
Ko-Ke-Te: Wet (Dry)
Ko-Ke-Ko: Flat (Uneven)
Ko-Ke-Ka: Balanced (Unbalanced)
Ko-Ke-Ke: Still (Active)
Ko-Ke-La: Thirsty
Ko-Ke-Lo: Hungry
Ko-Ke-Le: Tired

POSITIVE MANNER: Ca-Me
Korean = Gamejong

Ka-Me-Va: Enthusiastic
Ka-Me-Vo: Optimistic
Ka-Me-Ve: Confident
Ka-Me-Ma: Dignified / Elegant
Ka-Me-Mo: Generous
Ka-Me-Me: xxxxxxx
Ka-Me-Ta: Pleased
Ka-Me-To: Happy
Ka-Me-Te: Silly/Giddy
Ka-Me-Ko: Humble
Ka-Me-Ka: Compassionate
Ka-Me-Ke: xxxxxxx
Ka-Me-La: Kind
Ka-Me-Lo: Charitable
Ka-Me-Le: Helpful

FOOD – Ka-Ma
Hindi = Khaana

Ka-Ma-Va: Eat
Ka-Ma-Vo: Swallow
Ka-Ma-Voe: Chew
Ka-Ma-Ma: Meal
Ka-Ma-Mo: Soup
Ka-Ma-Me: Dish – Recipe
Ka-Ma-Ta: Rice
Ka-Ma-To: Pasta
Ka-Ma-Te: Noodles
Ka-Ma-Ka: Chips / Fries
Ka-Ma-Ko: Cereal
Ka-Ma-Ke: Nuts
Ka-Ma-La: Sandwich
Ka-Ma-Lo: Wrap – Kebab
Ka-Ma-Le: Burger

PHYSICAL ACTION: Ka-Ve
Hindi = Kaary

Ka-Ve-Va: Place / Affix
Ka-Ve-Vo: Dig
Ka-Ve-Ve: Bury
Ka-Ve-Ma: Spread
Ka-Ve-Mo: Push
Ka-Ve-Me: Pull
Ka-Ve-Ta: Hook
Ka-Ve-To: Fold
Ka-Ve-Te: Bend
Ka-Ve-Lo: Catch
Ka-Ve-Ka: Drop
Ka-Ve-Ke: Lift
Ka-Ve-La: Tie
Ka-Ve-Lo: Put
Ka-Ve-Le: Spray

BODY, INTERNAL: Mo-Mo
Korean = Mom

Mo-Mo-Va: Skeleton
Mo-Mo-Vo: Spine
Mo-Mo-Ve: Ribs
Mo-Mo-Ma: Bone
Mo-Mo-Mo: Blood
Mo-Mo-Me: Muscle
Mo-Mo-Ta: Flesh
Mo-Mo-To: Sweat
Mo-Mo-Te: Digestive System
Mo-Mo-Ka: Vomit
Mo-Mo-Ko: Burps
Mo-Mo-Ke: Fart / Flatulance
Mo-Mo-La: Poo / Defacate
Mo-Mo-Lo: Pee / Urinate
Mo-Mo-Le: Diarrhea

SEQUENCE: Va-Ka
Tamil = Varicai

Va-Ka-Va: Last
Va-Ka-Vo: Ultimate
Va-Ka-Ve: After
Va-Ka-Ma: Series
Va-Ka-Mo: Repeat
Va-Ka-Me: Progression
Va-Ka-Ta: Initial
Va-Ka-To: Before
Va-Ka-Te: First
Va-Ka-Ka: Penultimate
Va-Ka-Ko: Next
Va-Ka-Ke: Previous
Va-Ka-La: Between
Va-Ka-Lo: Middle
Va-Ka-Le: Queue

DAY (date) – Me-Te
Nepalese = Miti

Me-Te-Va: Monday
Me-Te-Vo: Tuesday
Me-Te-Ve: Wednesday
Me-Te-Ma: Thursday
Me-Te-Mo: Friday
Me-Te-Me: Saturday
Me-Te-Ta: Sunday
Me-Te-To: Weekend
Me-Te-Te: Week
Me-Te-Ka: Today
Me-Te-Ko: Tomorrow
Me-Te-Ke: Yesterday
Me-Te-La: Day After Tomorrow
Me-Te-Lo: x
Me-Te-Le: x

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