OMO: Lesson 6 – First Word Hoards

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An auxiliary language is essential, one wee phrase book to be anywhere in the world, a language simple enough for anyone to learn but complex enough to 8handle most situations. There are limits to OMO, but the limits were very much intended in order to open it up to the wider population of the world. Better to obtain mastery in a new, equal-for-all & quite finite language, than learn a complicated alien tongue as if one’s mind were a mere colony of an imperial power.

It is very difficult to get people to switch habits. A child in Botswana cannot be expected to learn the complexities of English or Mandarin, for example, two of the most widely spoken tongues. Learning a new language is a difficult task, but I hope to present to the world a simple to learn, easy to communicate universal language. Auxiliary in consistence, it is complex enough to facilitate huge swathes of our Human interactions, but not so complex as to prohibit its learning to proficiency by the general masses of the planet.

We are on our way, however, & it is time to get into the nuts & bolts of OMO, the main vocab. As mentioned in Lesson 3, when combining the 15 core sounds into ‘double onset’ pairs, we can create 225 different words such as Le-Lo & Va-Me, with the stress being made on the first syllable, rendering the two examples Lee-lo & Vay-me. These 225 words constitute a basic strata, a primordial phonology, on which human communication may exist utilising words such as ‘book,’ ‘computer’ & ‘meat.’ In this lesson we shall look at three Trunk words & their 15 branches,supplying us with 45 new ‘triple onset’ words to learn, plus their fyres. That there are hints of the English language in these root words. I felt that this method would negate Karl Haag’s criticism of how artificial languages create their lexicon, when he wrote;

It is precisely because artificial languages randomly accumulate the plundered detritus which forms their core, that, from a logical point of view, they are fundamentally inferior to real and historically-attested languages; they often destroy both the logic and the aesthetic beauty of any inner conceptual interconnection and elaboration which, thanks to the root words, permeate a natural language when it is allowed to grow naturally, and they thus offend the mind as much as the sensitivities.

As we proceed through the Lexicon, the root word phonetics shall be dispensed across the many languages of the planet, thus creating a vocabulary that has commonality with almost every tongue on the planet. Esperanto & Ido, for example, have mainly stemmed from European languages like Latin, Spanish, French, German, and English, which precludes them from two thirds of the world obtaining at least the hint that I attempting to provide.


ALCOHOL: La-Co

Language is essentially expressions and sentences are deeply rooted in the real world, & more or less everybody loves a drink. Before we look at the rest of its word hoard, lets see how fyers may be applied to the word for alcohol.

M-M-La-Co: To do Alcohol is essentially getting drunk
V-K-La-Co: To personify Alcohol is to deem somebody an alcoholic. In each instance here the ‘la’ element would be stressed and sound as ‘laay.’

With branch words, the stress comes with the middle syllable, so whiskey is pronounced something like Lay-Coor-Ve.

La-Co-Va: Brandy
La-Co-Vo: Whiskey
La-Co-Ve: Wine
La-Co-Ma: Rum
La-Co-Mo: Saki / Rice Wine
La-Co-Me: Stout / Guinness
La-Co-Ta: Gin
La-Co-To: Vodka
La-Co-Te: Tequila
La-Co-Co: Ale
La-Co-Ca: Cider
La-Co-Ce: Home Brew / Moonshine
La-Co-La: Bubbly (Champagne / Prosecco)
La-Co-Lo: Baileys / Irish Cream
La-Co-Le: Beer / Lager

Like Alcohol, the sport of Athletics is a truly international entity, & one which would benefit from a universal language. An athlete would then be a V-K-Le-Te, with the ‘le’ sounding like ‘lee.’


ATHLETICS: Le-Te

Le-Te-Va: Olympics
Le-Te-Vo: Track
Le-Te-Ve: Field
Le-Te-Ma: Race
Le-Te-Mo: Marathon
Le-Te-Me: Relay
Le-Te-Ca: Long jump
Le-Te-Co: High jump
Le-Te-Ce: Triple jump
Le-Te-Ta: Shot put
Le-Te-Ta: Javelin
Le-Te-Ta: Discus
Le-Te-La: National anthem
Le-Te-Lo: Medal
Le-Te-Le: Podium

Continuing the theme that a useful auxiliary language must have a vocabulary drawn from universal themes and every day occurrences, our final root word of the lesson is TOOL, pronounced TO-LO. These are objects, so Tools is T-T-To-Lo & Screwdrivers are T-T-To-Lo.


TOOLS (To-Lo)

To-Lo-Va: Drill
To-Lo-Vo: Saw
To-Lo-Ve: Measuring tape
To-Lo-Ma: Sandpaper
To-Lo-Mo: Nails
To-Lo-Me: Screw
To-Lo-Ca: Screwdriver
To-Lo-Co: Hammer
To-Lo-Ce: Spirit level
To-Lo-Ta: Bolt
To-Lo-To: Nut
To-Lo-Te: Washer
To-Lo-La: Scissors
To-Lo-Lo: Spade
To-Lo-Le: Wrench

To conlcude this lesson, it is the using of 2 or 3 syllable words with stress which allows for an easy understanding & a natural separation of words by the mind. This system also taps into the origins of language, for both Vedic Sanskrit & ancient Greek possess a similar system of accentuation in which pitch is dominant. That’s gotta be a good thing, right?

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