OMO: Lesson 3 – Word Construction

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So, on with the course. Having established the script of OMO, we can now assemble the core sounds. Combining the five consonants with the three syllables gives us fifteen possible core sounds being;

ME – MO – MA
VE – VO – VA
KE – KO – KA
LE – LO – LA
TE – TO – TA

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These core sounds, or ‘morphemes,’ are never used individually to create a word. The creation of the vocabulary begins when we add two core sounds together. These combinations create 225 different words such as Le-Lo & Va-Me, the idea being that they constitute a basic strata, a primordial phonology, on which human communication may exist utilising words such as ‘book,’ ‘computer’ & ‘meat.’ There is no scope for intelligent conversation, per se, but there will be enough variety & flexibility in these 225 words to form a general & global sense of understanding. This level provides enough communication to survive & interact in life, & may transpose easily into a situation where we find ourselves in any non-native lingual area.

When designing a universal language, I understood that it should inherently contain layered levels of proficiency to reflect the natural acquistion of language. Like infants we first learn the sounds, then create a word pool to enable communication with our family members & playtime friends. After establishing this skill-set, & as the infant brain is enabled with greater powers of speech, the natural instinct for Humans is to converse. To facilitate this, each basic word then becomes a trunk for 15 new compound words, which are all connected familially to each other through the trunk. Linguists have a word for this kind of synthetic language, ‘agglutinative,’ derived from the Latin verb agglutinare, which means “to glue together”.

There are four sets of words that differ from this general schema,the first being six basic words consisiting of two vowels only. When pronouncing them the main stress should be on e first vowel, such as E-A sounding like eee-ay. These are;

AE : Is/are
EA: IS  Not/Are Not

OE : Yes
EO : No

OA : With
AO : Without

The other three sets to differ from the principle schema are; (1) the numbers, formed from a vowel-consonant-vowel combination, (2) Linking words like prepositions & conjunctions (see next lesson); & (3) the pronouns & possessive pronouns such as ‘you’ & ‘yours.’ The latter group are created from the 30-strong word pool formed by the diphthongean ‘consonant-vowel-vowel’ combination. Not all of the 30 possibilities have been utilised, which should ensure ease of understanding. Note how some words represent several of shades of the core meaning, subject-object superfluities which may be dismissed to ensure a smoother running of the Unversal langauge.

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PRONOUNS

MEO – Me, I
VEO – You
KEO – We, Us
TEO – They, Them, Those
LEO – Him, He
LEA – She, Her

POSSESSIVES

MOE – Mine
VOE – Yours
KOE – Ours
TOE – Theirs
LOE – His
LOA – Hers

A simple study of the 12 words will show immediately how the pronouns & the possessive pronouns are different yet phonetically similar. Keep it in the family to speak. So, have a pop at learning & sayong aloud these 12 words & speak OMO for the first time in your life. If you’re inclined to stress sounds within words, then press a little on the first vowel please, but in this OMO instance stress is not important. However, for the rest of the lexcion stress plays an important part…

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